Two portraits, two Professors.

Brains, Alzheimer’s, inflammation, then two days later diabetes, sugar levels, heart disease and fitness. Jeez, thankfully not my visit to the Doctor here in the West of Scotland, but the studies and practices of two Professors I shot portraits of very recently for two different editorial clients.

Amusingly the two unrelated photography jobs took place in side by side buildings at the University of Glasgow (if only I’d known that while trying to park the car), and both required of me to shoot environmental portraits of two learned Professors. Even turns out they knew each other and one had been in the other’s class.

University buildings can sometimes be a little haphazard and lived in, especially science labs, and Professor’s offices are rarely the most inspiring of places, either too small, too cramped, too busy with books, too dark, or just too messy.

 

Professor Jonathan Cavanagh, Professor of Psychiatry & Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

 

Professor Jonathan Cavanagh, Professor of Psychiatry & Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

 

Thankfully these two assignments were in one of the modern buildings at the University and after a quick walk around with the gents I had to photograph, we settled on a few locations and shot a variety of images. Into the science lab, a few portraits, then into a conference room, looking at stopping off in hall ways to utilise bright blue walls and nice windows light, and with Professor Sattar we nipped outside to see his bike, as part of his story was about making sure to get enough exercise and keep your heart strong.

 

Professor Naveed Sattar, in his lab at the Institute of Cardiovascular Studies and Medical Sciences, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

 

Professor Naveed Sattar, at the Institute of Cardiovascular Studies and Medical Sciences, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

I post a few frames here from the shoots, sadly no good tear sheets to go with these this time. One client used the images on their website, another in a magazine, but neither were particularly inspiring uses sadly. A shame as both gents had been very kind and generous with their time and doing what was required to keep the photographer happy and to fulfil the brief. But examples none the less of environmental portraits shot to satisfy a brief, and with minimal disruption to the busy working life of the sitter – another consideration I always feel, and that’s where professionalism of the photographer comes in, the ability to get in, get the required portraits and images, and not leave the sitter fuming at the amount of time it took and leaving them with a bad feeling for your editorial or corporate client.

Thank you gents!

 

Recent Tear Sheets

Here’s a couple of tear sheets from recent work…

First up, nice usage of some photography I shot on assignment for Greenpeace in Iitate, near Fukushima, in Japan, covering the nuclear radiation decontamination efforts there. It’s a shocking state of affairs there, the Fukushima nuclear disaster is far from finished and it is estimated the clean up will take at least another 40 years…but of course Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his government wish to present a clean, decontaminated face to the world as the 2020 Olympics looms.

Here’s the cover and a spread from the recent Greenpeace report which used the images, and which makes for sobering reading.

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Image above shows a Japanese worker ‘decontaminating’ the forest, one stone at a time…the moss will grow back in weeks, and be contaminated due to the radiation held within the soil. A couple more spreads below from within the report…

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Another tear sheet just popped in to the studio is the below, a series of images shot for Historic Scotland magazine documenting a day in the life of one of their Rangers, and a journalist trying out the job for the day.  It was a fascinating reportage and portrait shoot, on Edinburgh’s Holyrood Park and Arthur’s Seat, granting me a fascinating insight in the park life, its history and the archaeology of the area.

The job required it was shot in mid-Winter, but the brief required the images to look like Spring as that is when the article would run in the magazine. The day of the shoot was a cold, dark, grey, winter day. Nothing like spring. But then the clouds parted and for 10 minutes there was blue sky and sunshine. I shot like crazy. Hey presto, spring time.

Alas, I was disappointed by the usage of the images, by the spread. The design wasn’t to my liking so much, but the client was happy and that ultimately is the aim.

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More tear sheets to come soon…

Hello Paul Smith

All photographers have lists – lists of places they wish to travel and photograph, festivals or events they’d like to witness and photograph, places in their home town they want to record or document, or if you shoot portraits, a list of people you’d like to photograph.

For some time now Sir Paul Smith, of of Britain’s most well known and well respected fashion designers has been on my ‘Portrait wish list’. And yesterday I managed to shoot a few portraits of him, not in ideal circumstances, and not quite as I’d have liked, but sometimes you take your opportunity, and some opportunities are better than no opportunity.

 

World-renowned designer Paul Smith opens the 'Hello, My Name Is Paul Smith', exhibition at The Lighthouse, in Glasgow, Scotland, on 20 January 2016.  The exhibition, drawing from Paul Smith's career and personal archives and collections, runs at The Lighthouse, Scotland's Centre for Design and Architecture, from January 21st until 20th March 2016. The exhibition invites you into Paul Smith's world; a world of fashion, creation, inspiration, collaboration, wit and beauty. (J. Sutton-Hibbert/Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert)

Sir Paul was in Glasgow, Scotland, to open his new exhibition ‘Hello, My Name Is Paul Smith’ at The Lighthouse design centre. There was to be a press viewing and photo opportunity, and I availed myself of that opportunity. Alas it was a busy occasion, and the possibility of a one-to-one portrait session, with time, was not available.

But I do what I do. I’d adept at making the most of these situations. I work fast, I work around the obstacles, step past hurdles and still deliver, still bring back an image of use. Just like on many assignments, life throws hurdles at you, rugs are pulled from under your feet, but I keep calm, keep shooting, work around things and ultimately deliver. That, sometimes, is what clients are paying you for.

 

Fukushima and Photography.

Last month I had the pleasure of sitting down, at Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, with Japanese photographer and daguerreotypist Takashi Arai to discuss photography and the Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan.

I have known Takashi-san since my Japan days, and since March 11th 2012, when the Great East Japan earthquake struck, both Takashi and I have in our own ways and through our own photography photographed the Fukushima nuclear disaster and the consequences of it for large swathes of Japan and the population. In the below video, which sadly only records the first half of the talk, we discuss our respective works and photographs.

Takashi-san’s book, of his daguerrotype work, including his images from his nuclear project, ‘Monuments’, is now released, in a limited edition of 1,000. Takashi Arai ‘Monuments’.

 

Mark’s AfricaSolo.

Another portrait assignment from a few weeks back, this one of Scottish adventurer and cyclist Mark Beaumont. And not the usual Scottish editorial photography location, this one took place during a few days trip over to Cairo, Egypt, to photograph the start of Mark’s AfricaSolo World Speed Record expedition to cycle from Cairo to Cape Town.

The idea with this portrait was to shoot something the day before Mark began his expedition, to get images which could be used by himself for his social media, his record of the expedition, and for use by his various sponsors back home in Scotland. Instead of shooting in downtown Cairo, in anonymous looking streets, we headed out to the Pyramids, something nice and iconic to place Mark as being in Africa, something that would appeal to the Scottish newspapers the following day for their reports of his expedition beginning.  Our use of the Pyramids as a backdrop was slightly hampered by the zealous forces of security that patrol the desert and the Giza Necropolis checking for filming and photography permits, and this dictated where we shot the images and some piece to camera interviews.

Scottish adventurer Mark Beaumont, in Cairo, Egypt, 9 April 2015. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved, 2015.
Scottish adventurer Mark Beaumont, in Cairo, Egypt, 9 April 2015. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved, 2015.

The above image and some of Mark cycling, warming up his legs and bike, did indeed run the next day in the UK newspapers. But by that time we were onwards, the expedition had begun with a 7am start at the iconic Cairo Tower, the point where regulations stated the Guinness World Record had to begin. There Mark was met with various media, well-wishers and fellow cyclists who helped him get out of the city in fine style, with a Friday being chosen for the ‘Off’ as the street would be quiet due to the day being a holiday…

Mark Beaumont, in centre, on the countdown ready to start, Cairo, Egypt. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved, 2015.
Mark Beaumont, in centre, on the countdown ready to start, Cairo, Egypt. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved, 2015.

And from there it was out of the city, myself and a film crew scrunched up on the back of a jeep vehicle, filming and photographing through the bumpy streets and then out past the first military checkpoint and into the desert country roads…And soon after this was where I parted ways, Mark was on his own, and I was heading back to Cairo to send images back to the UK from a coffee shop with decent wifi. The normal life of a photographer, “flat white, a triangular sandwich and your wifi code please.”

Scottish adventurer Mark Beaumont departs Cairo to begin his Africa Solo expedition. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved, 2015.
Scottish adventurer Mark Beaumont departs Cairo to begin his Africa Solo expedition. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved, 2015.

 

And did Mark succeed you all ask? Yep, 41 days, 10 hours and 22 minutes after that 7am Cairo Tower start, Mark cycled into Cape Town, South Africa, and into the record books! Congratulations Mark!