Longannet Colliery, 2001.

Following on from previous successful publications Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert has brought out a sixth publication of work in collaboration with Café Royal Books, ‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

The work which was shot at Longannet Colliery in Fife during a newspaper magazine assignment takes a look at the working life in what was Scotland’s last commercially working deep coal mine. These pictures were shot in 2001, and after flooding in March 2002 the mine closed, thus ending underground coal mining in Scotland.

The book published in an edition of 250, is available from Café Royal Books, at the price of £6.00 plus P&P.

Publish Date 16.01.19
32 pages
14cm x 20cm
b/w digital

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

A further seventh publication and collaboration between Jeremy and Café Royal Books will follow in July, titled ‘Scottish Orange Walks, 1993-1998’.

Clyde Built – Shipbuilding on the River Clyde

I’m pleased to announce that some of my archive work, of shipbuilding on Glasgow’s River Clyde in the 1990’s, has been published as a small book, and is due to be exhibited over the summer here in Glasgow.

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert — Shipbilding on the River Clyde

The photographs, shot in the Kvaerner, Yarrow and Ferguson’s shipyards on the River Clyde, have been published as a limited edition book by the industrious Craig Atkinson at Café Royal Books: ‘Shipbuilding on The River Clyde’.

A selection of the work from the book will be exhibited, in a group show ‘Govan / Gdansk’ at Street Level Photoworks gallery in Glasgow, Scotland, from 4th June until 31st July.

The show opening is Friday, June 3rd, at 6pm if you’re in the neighbourhood and would like to pop by. My book will be on sale at the show also, and on Saturday 4th June I’ll be talking about the work at the gallery. Please join us!

The book and exhibition were showcased a few days back by the Daily Record. You can read the article here, and here’s how it looked in a pretty decent spread.

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This exhibition at Street Level, curated by director Malcolm Dickson, will encompass the work of four photographers- Michal Szlaga of Poland, Nick Hedges of England, Raymond Depardon of France, and myself. The works on show link the shipyards of Govan in Glasgow and Gdansk in Poland and their post-industrial decline and resilience.

Michal Szlaga’s ‘Stocznia/Shipyard – Documents of Loss’ is the outcome of a 15 year project in which Szlaga has documented the buildings of the Gdansk Shipyard, their gradual demolition and the construction of new ones. For Szlaga, the shipyard represents a dynamic landscape of industrial architecture reflecting history and its people, the images loaded with memories of the turbulent times of the anti-communist revolution.

In 1980, the French Magnum photographer Raymond Depardon was commissioned by the Sunday Times to record aspects of Glasgow and the evocative results are now lauded as telling an unremittingly bleak portrayal of urban deprivation and decay. In 1968 Nick Hedges was commissioned by the housing charity Shelter to document the abject living conditions being experienced in slum housing in the UK, including Glasgow. The images here are from the seminal and humanistic body of work ‘A Life Worth Living’, which, like Depardon’s work, see children happily at play against the backdrop of the Govan cranes, evidence of a community spirit unthwarted by the harsh realities of life.  Shot for editorial clients, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s ‘Shipbuilding’ from the mid-1990’s is a critical time capsule at the Kvaerner shipyards in Govan which catches the monumentality of this industry and the people who drove it. 

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert — Shipbilding on the River Clyde

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert — Shipbilding on the River Clyde

The exhibition ‘Govan/Gdansk’ and the programme of events around the exhibition are organised in association with an RSE – funded research network on Regeneration and Waterfront Heritage Zones, exploring participatory approaches to waterfront regeneration in urban spaces in transition in Northern European cities. The main case studies of regeneration focus on Govan and wider Glasgow (Scotland) and Gdansk (Poland), each of which are dealing with the consequences of the post-industrial demise of the shipbuilding industry, trying to find a transition into a new economy and community.

Associated Events:

Street Level Photoworks | 4th June 2016, 1-4pm
Symposium: Attracted to dereliction? Documenting post-industrial heritage

•  Prof Katarzyna Kosmala (UWS) Introduction – Gdansk/Govan; Govan/Gdansk
•  Michal Szlaga talk and tour of the works
•  Dr Waldemar Affelt (Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, and the Main Conservation Commission to the General Conservator of the Polish Republic) addressing issues of documenting and conversation, linking to his on-going research on Gdansk shipyard and post-industrial regeneration.
•  Talks: Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Chris Leslie
•  Discussion facilitated by Graham Jeffery (UWS)

 

UWS, School of Media Culture and Society, Paisley Campus | 3rd June 2016, 1-3pm, Room A100

Seminar is free and open to public. To register pls email: Susan.Caldwell@uws.ac.uk  by 31 May.

UWS research seminar series:  Panel on politics of regeneration, artists lens and community engagement with Polish artist Michal Szlaga’s video screening

•  Chair Prof Katarzyna Kosmala (UWS)
•  Dr Waldemar Affelt (Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, and the Main Conservation Commission to the General Conservator of the Polish Republic) discussing his collaboration with Michal Szlaga in Gdansk shipyard, problematizing the heritage value of the site.
•  Roman Sebastyanski (UWS) addressing Gdansk shipyard regeneration through artists lens and public participation.
•  Dr Peter Matthews (Stirling University) discussing politics around connecting communities to/in post-regeneration era.

Alongside the exhibition we will be selling copies of Raymond Depardon’s ‘Glasgow’.
112 pages, 30x23cm, £20, and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s ‘Shipbuilding on the River Clyde’ on Cafe Royal Books, £7.

‘Klondykers in Shetland’

*** New just in! There’s going to be a second edition of the book printed. Another 150 are being printed to meet demands! You can order them here. ***

My fourth Café Royal Book was released last Thursday, and very nicely sold out overnight! Thank you everyone for your interest and support.

Klondykers in Shetland 1994‘ is the last collaboration from myself and Craig Atkinson at Café Royal for this year. If you do wish to try and get your hands on one then Street Level Photoworks in Glasgow, the shop at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, and possibly Foyles in London, have limited numbers still I believe.

Klondykers, Shetland 1994
Release Date 18.11.15
28 pages
14cm x 20cm
b/w digital
Edition of 150

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“There’s blue on red, red on red, green on black, and that one over there is just rust on rust”, chortled the Coast Guard helicopter pilot as we flew over the waters of the Shetland isles and looked down on the fleet of East European ‘Klondyker’ fish factory ships all moored, all awaiting the arrival of the silver fish.

It was the early 1990’s, Communism had collapsed and new economies were struggling in Eastern Europe. Ships had been sent to Scottish waters to buy up the mackerel and herring catches, and take them back frozen or tinned to feed Bulgaria, Romania and the countries of the former Soviet bloc.

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But the arrival of the Klondykers as they were known was gaining unwanted attention, ships were running aground all too frequently on the rocks of Shetland, and on visits into port others were detained, deemed as being unseaworthy. With ships impounded, and without work, crews went unpaid, and the men speaking no English drifted to the garbage dumps to look for items which could be salvaged, recycled, and taken back to Eastern Europe.

I went to the Shetland twice, around 1994, to photograph, both times on assignment, badgering fish merchant agents to take me out to the ships on their speedboats when they visited to cut deals with Bulgarian skippers. Or another time I agreed with the Coast Guard to be used as ‘live practice’, to be lowered by harness and winch onto a moving ship in exchange for getting up in their helicopter to shoot aerial shots of the Klondyker fleet. I readily agreed, for the excitement, for the adventure, and for the access knowing that Colin Jacobson, then picture editor at the Independent Saturday Magazine, would never hire me a helicopter.

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Cyrillic signs hung in Lerwick town centre, telling the men of the Klondykers where they could find the Fisherman’s Mission, where they could find God, cups of tea and some help, and you could spot the men as they walked the town, in their Eastern European fashions of leather jackets and jeans. Up at the garbage dump I photographed as islanders drove up to offer the Klondyker men old televisions and electronics, or just to stop by and bring them cigarettes and gifts.

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Out on the ships I got lucky and found myself on a ship crewed by Romanians, and I managed to use the little Romanian language skills I’d learned while working on another project outside of Bucharest. I chatted with the ship’s doctor, and he played his accordion for me, we toured the ship, and I photographed as men and women worked, cleaning the mackerel which had just arrived, or played table tennis as they awaited more fish.

The ships have gone now, but the word Klondyker still holds resonance in the Shetland, and of course upon the rocks are the ships which never left.

 

Visit Café Royal Books website.

A small article about ‘Klondykers in Shetland’ ran in the Shetland News last week when the book was released, with a few comments from myself.

Document Scotland & Café Royal Books

I’m pleased to announce that my latest publication with Café Royal Books, North Sea Fishing, forms part of a limited edition box set along with books by my Document Scotland colleagues.

Published and released to coincide with Document Scotland’s The Ties That Bind exhibition at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, the box set is now available for pre-order.

North Sea Fishing will also be available by itself, outwith the box set, but not until October I believe.

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The Document Scotland 2015 box set contains the following:

Sancta Maria Abbey, Nunraw — Colin McPherson
36 pages, b/w

Tunnock’s — Sophie Gerrard
28 pages, colour

Dookits — Stephen McLaren
28 pages, colour

North Sea Fishing — Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert
36 pages, b/w

 

NorthSeaFishing

Each individual title is an edition of 150.
Boxed set is an edition of 50.

Published on the occasion of Document Scotland: The Ties That Bind at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, September 2015 — April 2016.