Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert

Thoughts & stories from a hard working editorial, corporate, portrait, reportage photographer based in Glasgow, Scotland. T.+44-(0)7831-138817

April 28, 2015
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Gather Connect Inspire!

On May 14th and 15th Skye ATLAS Arts are running an arts event, Gather Connect Inspire, which aims to inspire creativity, create connections and exchange skills. Document Scotland are very pleased to have been invited, and Colin McPherson and I are excited to attend and participate.

On the morning of Thursday 14th Colin and I will present photography work by Document Scotland and other photographers who we have showcased on our website, and in the afternoon we will participate in workshops and be available for one-on-one photography portfolio sessions with local artists and photographers.

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From the webpage for the event, where you can also book incredibly reasonably priced tickets, but you’d better hurry as there is a limit to the numbers…

Confirmed speakers include:

Future Postive Studio – a multidisciplinary creative and digital studio that specialises in content, strategy and social outreach. Co-founders Jakub Michalski and Igor Termenon will expolore the potential of digital technology and offer one-to-one or workshop opportunities to discuss any questions you many have about how to use digital to its best advantage

Highland Print Studio – an open access workshop with facilities for printmaking (intaglio, relief, sceenprinting and stone lithography) and digital imaging. Studio Manager John McNaught will discuss the facilites and the work of the HPS and run one-to-one portfolio reviews for aspiring and well-established printmakers

Hot Tap Media – is a digital production company. Its director, Rebecca Thompson, will give an insight into the potential of crowdfunding as a means to fund creative projects. She will also offer more personal advice during one-to-ones or small group workshops

The Poundshop – an art project with the goal of spreading design to a wider audience and creating a platform for designers to sell items in pop-up shops. Sara Melin will give a presentation and run also run a creative workshop

Talent Development Initiative – there will be presentations from three successful applicants of the 2014 Talent Development Initiative: Suzy Lee, Heather McDermott and Emma Noble giving them the opportunity to showcase how their work has developed thanks to the support of this programme

Wasps Studios - a charity that provides affordable studios to support artists and arts organisations across Scotland. Michelle Emery-Barker will reveal their plans to develop a studio with accommodation in Skye

There will also be an evening meal on Thursday 14 May at the Isle of Skye Baking Company featuring a performance from Leighton Jones (included in the cost of your ticket)

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We look forward to hopefully seeing you there! Join us!

April 27, 2015
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Recent tear sheets!

A small selection of some recent tear sheets for your delectation. It’s always pleasurable as a photographer to see your work in print, to smell the ink and see how the work has been laid out, to see the design of the magazine spread, to see if the designer has used it well, or cropped it badly…

From this month’s LandScape magazine, a spread of my photographs from the Common Ridings in Selkirk, shot as part of my project Unsullied and Untarnished (which will be on show at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery as of September 26th this year in a Document Scotland show.) Theses two following pics are only some of the spread, but the best pages. Alas it isn’t the most beautiful of spreads, a lot of the images have been cropped. But nice to see the photographs in print as always. (See a complete set of photographs of Scottish Common riding festivals here.)

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My photographs of Selkirk Common Ridings in LandScape magazine, 2015.

 

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My photographs of Selkirk Common Ridings in LandScape magazine, 2015.

The following portrait, of Professor Lorna Dawson of the James Hutton Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland, was shot by me recently on assignment for Nature Magazine. Prof. Dawson is a world leading expert of the forensic analysis of soil DNA, and along with her team she brings her formidable talents and knowledge to bare in helping crack crime cases round the world. Soil Sleuth indeed, and a very hospitable and friendly woman to hang out with on assignment. I great enjoyed this assignment on a  gloriously sunny Monday morning in Aberdeen. You can read the article about Professor Lorna Dawson, ‘Soil Sleuth’, here in Nature magazine.

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Portrait of Professor Lorna Dawson, in Nature Magazine.

 

And the most colourful for last, a portrait photograph below from a few years back that I shot on assignment (originally for The Times newspaper) in Tokyo, Japan, of Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama. I had the pleasure and privilege to photograph Kusama-san’s twice in her Tokyo studio, and this portrait used this month/week on the cover of The Art Newspaper comes from the second time I met her. As you can see she is quite individual, and a fascinating character to listen to and to photograph. Again a very enjoyable assignment, and nice to see the image pop up unexpectedly this week in the paper, sold via agents Getty Images. See a full set of photographs of portraits of Yayoi Kusama, and her work, here.

Portrait of Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, in The Art Newspaper.

Portrait of Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, in The Art Newspaper.

 

Thanks for taking a look, and as ever should you wish to licence any of these photographs, or if you’re looking to have something specific photographed then please get in touch! Thanks!

April 2, 2015
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Africa Solo, no. 2.

Last week I wrote a blog about Mark Beaumont, Scottish cyclist, adventurer, author, speaker, (he’s multi-talented) who is shortly to attempt a World Record speed attempt at cycling Cairo to Cape Town, and cycling it solo with no support team. Mark Beaumont, Africa Solo.

I’ve been doing a little pre-expedition photography with Mark, covering the build up and the story of the expedition. Yesterday we headed over to cycling apparel manufacturers Endura (their motto is Born in Scotland, Ridden Worldwide) to check on the design and production of Mark’s kit for his gruelling 10,000km ride through Africa.

Mark Beaumont, in grey t-shirt, checks designs of his kit, at Endura. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont, in grey t-shirt, checks designs of his kit, at Endura. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

All the design work of the kit has been done in-house in Endura, with the logos of Mark’s expedition and his sponsor’s logos supplied and incorporated. Mark’s gone for a light coloured kit, all the better for repelling the Saharan sun as he heads South.

Mark Beaumont checks designs of his kit, at Endura. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont checks designs of his kit, at Endura. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont, in grey t-shirt, checks designs of his kit, at Endura. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont,  at Endura. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

And then, as far from Saharan sun as you can, we headed out into the Scottish landscape, Mark to put his kit and bike through some last minute preparation tests before he heads to Cairo next week for the big off, to cycle #AfricaSolo.

Mark Beaumont, on his custom-built Koga bike, Scotland. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont, on his custom-built Koga bike, Scotland. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

April 1, 2015
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Twenty Three Seconds with Mr. Salmond.

So the picture desk call me, “Can you be in Aberdeen on Monday? We need a portrait of Alex Salmond.” Words to send fear into any editorial or magazine photographer in Scotland. Mr. Alex Salmond, former First Minister of Scotland, and former leader of the Scottish National Party, now MSP and standing as candidate for Westminster parliament in the forthcoming elections in May, is not known as an easy subject with photographers.

So off I toodled to Aberdeen, knowing full well that whatever moments I get with Mr. Salmond would be exactly that – moments. No full, long, lengthy slow photo shoots with Mr. Salmond. It would be brief, it may well even be brusque, or belligerent.

But my desk wants as much from the situation as I can muster, squeeze all options from the opportunity.   Talking shots during the interview?- Sure! Portrait – Sure, if you can get it! Candid on the stage/platform – of course! The key way to keep a picture desk happy is to provide options. Send them variety. Looking left/ looking right, verticals/horizontals, tight/loose. Options/options.

So I arrived early, a country hotel, not overly chic or endowed with background locations…except for just inside the door at the car park. A wall, with bright gold and reddish wallpaper. Some may say baronial in style, some may say Chinese restaurant. But to me it looked good. And it was beside the door. Mr. Salmond would have to come in that way, it was convenient. Rarely will a subject like himself wander far to suit the photographer’s whims. I could stop him before he’d gone far. It’d take seconds.

So I shoot a test shot, I have the journalist, the esteemed Matthew Engel of the Financial Times stand in for Mr. Salmond. It looks good. Lit by natural light, the fading daylight coming in from the dusky, damp, rainy carpark. But it could work.

Financial Times journalist Matthew Engel. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Financial Times journalist Matthew Engel. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Fast forward a few minutes and the car draws up. Mr. Salmond strides across the car park, I shoot a few frames, and I’m in the door before him. “Sir, hi, I’m from the Financial Times, could I just shoot one very quick portrait of you here please? It’ll take 1 minute.” Mr. Salmond looks around the vestibule, at the wall paper, and asks incredulously, “Here?”. “Yes, please, I’ll be fast”, I reply. He sighs exasperated, and passes his paperwork to his PA. It’s on. He strikes his pose, one hand in pocket, smiling straight to camera.

Bang, bang, bang, “Straight to me please Sir”, bang, bang, bang, and “Just glance out the door please.”

Heavyweight politician Alex Salmond, former First Minister of Scotland. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Heavyweight politician Alex Salmond, former First Minister of Scotland. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

“Excellent, thank you Sir.” Twenty-five frames in twenty-three seconds. Look at the camera metadata and count ‘em.

And he’s gone. Through the doors to my left and into his event. For me the job isn’t finished, I still have to cover inside, but the pressure is off, I’ve upright and horizontals, looking to camera, looking away, and scratching his head. I’ve options. It looks good, I’m happy, looks like a picture from a shoot of longer than 23 seconds. Result.

March 27, 2015
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Archiving Community Storytelling: Challenges and Opportunities

A week or so ago I attended a seminar hosted by Digital Commonwealth at the University of the West of Scotland, in Paisley, near Glasgow. The seminar, a one day event, was on the topic of Archiving Community Storytelling: Challenges and Opportunities.

The event was an opportunity for practitioners, academics and activists to explore the issues, opportunities and challenges of archiving community-based storytelling in the digital age.

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Presentations included Eilidh MacGlone (National Library of Scotland) presentating on “Archiving Digital Artefacts: Policy and Practice”, Tamar Millen‘s (Community Media Association) presentation on “Community media archiving in a research context”, Sara Thomas‘ (Wikimedian in Residence at Museums Galleries Scotland) presentation on ‘Reducing barriers to accessing open knowledge’, and more.

As a photographer, and through my work with my colleagues in Document Scotland, this was of course a topic of interest as we deal every day with concepts and implications of digital asset management, of metadata, keywording, and archiving photographs. How do we manage digital data in our long term projects? How do we archive usefully and sensibly in order that it will benefit future generations? Do we archive everything, or selectively edit and archive the edit only, and who does the editing, the artists or the community he/she is working with or documenting? There were many points brought up for discussion, with much to contemplate and take from the day’s seminar as I move forward on my projects.

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I think the key point for me for the day was the very line that on our projects now, with the amount of digital data that we amass – images, audio and movie files, that archiving has to be considered and built into the project from the very outset. There has to be a workflow for managing it, cataloging it, maintaining it, and an expectation and plan for the archiving of it – from the very beginning.

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Jennifer Jones, one of the organisers and hosts, has very usefully collated Tweets, links and presentations into a Storify page and I link it here (Archiving Community Storytelling: Challenges and Opportunities) as it contains information and links which may be of interest and use to those who grapple with and contemplate the above issues. Many thanks Jennifer and Professor David McGillivray for hosting the event and making it all possible.