Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert

News from an editorial, corporate, portrait, reportage photographer. Based in Scotland, tel. +44-(0)7831-138817

April 23, 2019
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A Contested Land, in Perth.

Pleased to announce that I’m exhibiting at Perth Museum and Art Gallery, along with my Document Scotland photographer colleagues in a show called A Contested Land.

The show opens today, 23rd April, and runs until 23rd June.

On May 9th there will be a drinks reception with talks by myself, Colin McPherson and Sophie Gerrard, at 7pm. It is free to attend, but to manage visitor numbers you need to book a ticket here.

Formed in 2012, Document Scotland is a collective of four Scottish documentary photographers, brought together by a common vision to witness and record important and diverse stories about Scotland and the Scots. Tired of the tropes and clichés which are often used to represent Scotland, their aim is to provide a more realistic view of their nation today.

Set within the context of contemporary political debate and social changes, A Contested Land consists of four new projects by photographers Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Sophie Gerrard, Colin McPherson and Stephen McLaren. Collectively, they examine the complex relationships between the nation’s people, history and land at one of the most important times in Scotland’s recent past.

The works reflect upon Scotland’s precarious environmental and economic landscape, within ongoing political conflicts that give these issues relevance and urgency. During both the Independence and European Union referendums, the word that dominated discussion was ‘change’ – it became the go-to for the dissatisfied. However, even with this uncertainty, the referendums have highlighted the fact that the Scottish people are proud of their identity and independent voice.

The four bodies of work presented in A Contested Land – exhibiting for the first time in Scotland at Perth Museum & Art Gallery, reflect upon the ongoing changes Scotland continues to face. The show was first exhibited at the MArtin Parr Foundation, in Bristol, in early 2019.

The show will then travel onwards to Dunoon Burgh Hall in the summer, FLOW Photofest, Inverness in September, and Photo North in Harrogate in November.

March 12, 2019
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Roma exhibition in Iowa, USA.

I’m pleased to say my photography of the Roma of Sintesti, Romania, is currently on show at the National Czech and Slovak Museum and Library Cedar Rapids, in Iowa, USA.

Until May 27th, 2019.

25 images, both black and white, from my multi year project which spanned 1990- 2006, are currently on show at the Museum’s Anderson Gallery.

Mia, a young Roma girl stands in front of a mermaid painted on the wall of a Roma home, in the old part of the Roma camp of Sintesti, Romania, in Setember 2004. Mermaids are very popular as wall decoration, but no-one within the camp knows the reason why they were first painted.

Between 1990 and 1997, and then again in 2004 and 2006, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert photographed the Roma people of Sintesti, Romania. The camp is home to approximately 1,000 Kalderari Roma, predominantly metal workers by tradition. Once nomadic, they now live in Sintesti, scorned by neighboring Romanians, and for many years they have been looked upon as a source of trouble and annoyance.

Sutton-Hibbert recorded daily life, festivities, traditions, and the working lifestyle of the Roma. It was a time of substantial change in the post-Communist era; new business opportunities were opening up and new influences were arriving in the country from the West. It seemed an important time to photograph this community as they faced the challenges this new era brought them, a time of preserving their traditions while adapting to the new.

Sutton-Hibbert’s photos of this community in 2004 and 2006 reflected the significant material and cultural changes and challenges brought by the economic fortunes these people found through their hard work in the scrap-metal business. Western influences and prosperous stability stood in tension with longstanding traditions, their nomadic heritage, and the differing desires between generations and genders.

Sponsored by Western Fraternal Life

January 22, 2019
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Longannet Colliery, 2001.

Following on from previous successful publications Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert has brought out a sixth publication of work in collaboration with Café Royal Books, ‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

The work which was shot at Longannet Colliery in Fife during a newspaper magazine assignment takes a look at the working life in what was Scotland’s last commercially working deep coal mine. These pictures were shot in 2001, and after flooding in March 2002 the mine closed, thus ending underground coal mining in Scotland.

The book published in an edition of 250, is available from Café Royal Books, at the price of £6.00 plus P&P.

Publish Date 16.01.19
32 pages
14cm x 20cm
b/w digital

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

‘Longannet Colliery, 2001’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/ Café Royal Books.

 

A further seventh publication and collaboration between Jeremy and Café Royal Books will follow in July, titled ‘Scottish Orange Walks, 1993-1998’.

January 22, 2019
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A Contested Land

Document Scotland’s A Contested Land has now opened at the Martin Parr Foundation in Bristol, England. The show runs until 16th March, 2019, before further showings in Scotland at Perth, Dunoon and Inverness. 

Document Scotland exhibition ‘A Contested Land’ opens at the Martin Parr Foundation, in Bristol, England, 15 January 2019. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, 2019

 

It gives us great pleasure to announce that our latest show, A Contested Land, including my new body of work Let Glasgow Flourish, successfully opened last week at the Martin Parr Foundation. Surrounded by friends, family, colleagues and esteemed members of the photographic community, a lively evening kicked off the show’s run in Bristol.

With talks by all four Document Scotland photographers – Sophie Gerrard, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Stephen McLaren and Colin McPherson, the crowd was entertained and the works on the walls introduced before the socialising began over drinks.

With thanks to all who attended including Annie Lyden of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, David Hurn/Magnum, Homer Sykes, Tony O’Shea, Brian Sparks, Daffyd Jones, Miles Ward, Craig Easton, Toby Smith, Jon Tonks, and many, many more. And of course many thanks to Martin Parr and his wonderful team for their support, generosity and hospitality.

Document Scotland exhibition ‘A Contested Land’ opens at the Martin Parr Foundation, in Bristol, England, 15 January 2019. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, 2019.

 

Document Scotland exhibition ‘A Contested Land’ opens at the Martin Parr Foundation, in Bristol, England, 15 January 2019. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, 2019.

 

Document Scotland exhibition ‘A Contested Land’ opens at the Martin Parr Foundation, in Bristol, England, 15 January 2019. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, 2019.

 

See more information about the show and the press release here.

Martin Parr Foundation
316 Paintworks
Arnos Vale
Bristol
BS4 3AR

Gallery opening times
Wed to Sat, 11am – 6pm
Sun to Tue, closed

Free entry to all exhibitions.

Touring exhibition dates

– Salon event at Stills Gallery Edinburgh 7th February 2019 (evening).
– Perth Art Gallery and Museum – 20th April 2019 – 23rd June 2019. Preview on 19th April.
– Dunoon Burgh Hall – 20th July 2019 – 18th August 2019. Preview on 19th July.
– FLOW Photofest, Inverness, September 2019.
.

December 11, 2018
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Two portraits, two Professors.

Brains, Alzheimer’s, inflammation, then two days later diabetes, sugar levels, heart disease and fitness. Jeez, thankfully not my visit to the Doctor here in the West of Scotland, but the studies and practices of two Professors I shot portraits of very recently for two different editorial clients.

Amusingly the two unrelated photography jobs took place in side by side buildings at the University of Glasgow (if only I’d known that while trying to park the car), and both required of me to shoot environmental portraits of two learned Professors. Even turns out they knew each other and one had been in the other’s class.

University buildings can sometimes be a little haphazard and lived in, especially science labs, and Professor’s offices are rarely the most inspiring of places, either too small, too cramped, too busy with books, too dark, or just too messy.

 

Professor Jonathan Cavanagh, Professor of Psychiatry & Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

 

Professor Jonathan Cavanagh, Professor of Psychiatry & Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

 

Thankfully these two assignments were in one of the modern buildings at the University and after a quick walk around with the gents I had to photograph, we settled on a few locations and shot a variety of images. Into the science lab, a few portraits, then into a conference room, looking at stopping off in hall ways to utilise bright blue walls and nice windows light, and with Professor Sattar we nipped outside to see his bike, as part of his story was about making sure to get enough exercise and keep your heart strong.

 

Professor Naveed Sattar, in his lab at the Institute of Cardiovascular Studies and Medical Sciences, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

 

Professor Naveed Sattar, at the Institute of Cardiovascular Studies and Medical Sciences, at the University of Glasgow. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2018.

I post a few frames here from the shoots, sadly no good tear sheets to go with these this time. One client used the images on their website, another in a magazine, but neither were particularly inspiring uses sadly. A shame as both gents had been very kind and generous with their time and doing what was required to keep the photographer happy and to fulfil the brief. But examples none the less of environmental portraits shot to satisfy a brief, and with minimal disruption to the busy working life of the sitter – another consideration I always feel, and that’s where professionalism of the photographer comes in, the ability to get in, get the required portraits and images, and not leave the sitter fuming at the amount of time it took and leaving them with a bad feeling for your editorial or corporate client.

Thank you gents!