Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert

Thoughts & stories from a hard working editorial, corporate, portrait, reportage photographer based in Glasgow, Scotland. T.+44-(0)7831-138817

March 27, 2015
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Archiving Community Storytelling: Challenges and Opportunities

A week or so ago I attended a seminar hosted by Digital Commonwealth at the University of the West of Scotland, in Paisley, near Glasgow. The seminar, a one day event, was on the topic of Archiving Community Storytelling: Challenges and Opportunities.

The event was an opportunity for practitioners, academics and activists to explore the issues, opportunities and challenges of archiving community-based storytelling in the digital age.

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Presentations included Eilidh MacGlone (National Library of Scotland) presentating on “Archiving Digital Artefacts: Policy and Practice”, Tamar Millen‘s (Community Media Association) presentation on “Community media archiving in a research context”, Sara Thomas‘ (Wikimedian in Residence at Museums Galleries Scotland) presentation on ‘Reducing barriers to accessing open knowledge’, and more.

As a photographer, and through my work with my colleagues in Document Scotland, this was of course a topic of interest as we deal every day with concepts and implications of digital asset management, of metadata, keywording, and archiving photographs. How do we manage digital data in our long term projects? How do we archive usefully and sensibly in order that it will benefit future generations? Do we archive everything, or selectively edit and archive the edit only, and who does the editing, the artists or the community he/she is working with or documenting? There were many points brought up for discussion, with much to contemplate and take from the day’s seminar as I move forward on my projects.

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I think the key point for me for the day was the very line that on our projects now, with the amount of digital data that we amass – images, audio and movie files, that archiving has to be considered and built into the project from the very outset. There has to be a workflow for managing it, cataloging it, maintaining it, and an expectation and plan for the archiving of it – from the very beginning.

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Jennifer Jones, one of the organisers and hosts, has very usefully collated Tweets, links and presentations into a Storify page and I link it here (Archiving Community Storytelling: Challenges and Opportunities) as it contains information and links which may be of interest and use to those who grapple with and contemplate the above issues. Many thanks Jennifer and Professor David McGillivray for hosting the event and making it all possible.

 

March 26, 2015
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A book fit for a Queen.

A week or so ago I had popped into a local Glasgow printing house, to check out some photography book publishing ideas with them, and came away with a nice little surprise!

As I sat down to talk with my contact at the printer’s he produced a small pile of books to show me, to show examples of their fine printing quality, of what they can do, to discuss options and needs. All great service, and it’s always good to see paper samples etc in hand, not just choosing options online.

The first book he handed me, as an example of a very bespoke little book was the one featured in the images here. As he passed it to me I noticed the logo on the cover, but thought nothing of it, it’s a logo I’ve grown very accustomed to over the past two years. And then I opened the book, and glanced at a few images and smiled…

Yep, the images in the book were mine, and I was holding a rare copy of a book only previously discussed and never seen, a fabled book made for a Queen. In this case a copy of a limited edition photography book made as a special gift for Queen Elizabeth II, and containing images of the Queen’s Baton Relay journey through the nations and territories of the Commonwealth.

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In late 2013, and for the first half of 2014 I was on and off on assignment on the baton relay, a trip which saw me visit 42 nations and territories, over 5 months, photographically covering the relay, sending back the images to Glasgow 2014 Limited each day for their use in the run up to the Glasgow 2014, 20th Commonwealth Games. I had been commissioned along with photographer Jordan Mansfield of Getty Images (we hopscotched continents, meeting only once in a Caribbean airport for 10 minutes) to cover the duration of the international sector of the relay, providing photographic coverage as well as writing a daily blog, and maintaining social media for the baton.

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During the relay I had heard that the images were being made into a book to send to Buckingham Palace, but I never saw the finished product. It was only ever produced in an edition of approximately 20 hand-made copies. Even after such a memorable, round the Commonwealth on 4 continents assignment, and the memories that a photojournalism assignment like that brings, it was great to see the photography in such a nice little book…

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A great assignment!

March 26, 2015
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Photography in Scotland, panel discussion.

Earlier this week I represented Document Scotland on a panel discussion held in Edinburgh on the topic of ‘Photography in Scotland’. Organised and hosted by Ratio 7:1 photography collective, a new collective of students of photography from Napier University, and held to coincide with their ‘Dismantle’ exhibition which is currently showing, the evening was deemed to be a huge success by all who took part and those attending as audience. Speakers on the discussion panel, ably chaired by Ratio 7:1’s John Dougan, were Malcolm Dickson of Street Level Photoworks, photographers David Eustace, Ron O’Donnell, & myself, and Dr. Roberta McGrath of Napier University, Edinburgh. Lively debates emerged between audience and panel, stimulated by questions from the audience on subjects such as gender bias in photography, the history of Scottish photography, the future of photography in Scotland, and what is success and how do you achieve it? As ever there were no definitive answers, but lots of opinions offered giving much fuel for thought and further discussion.

Document Scotland would like to congratulate John Dougan and his Ratio 7:1 colleagues on their ‘Dismantle’ photography show, and for organising and hosting such a successful panel discussion event. To find out a little more about Ratio 7:1, why they hosted the discussion evening, etc, we asked John to tell us a bit of their plans. The below comes from John and shows a few images of the evening.

 

John Dougan of Ratio 7:1 introduces the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

John Dougan of Ratio 7:1 introduces the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

The audience at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

The audience at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

Malcolm Dickson (centre of image) of Street Level Photoworks answers a question at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Malcolm Dickson (centre of image) of Street Level Photoworks answers a question at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

“Ratio 7:1 is a collective made up of seven year three students on the BA Photography programme at Edinburgh Napier University. John Dougan, Lysann Ehmann, Erin Semple, Susan McFadzean, Adam Kinship, Denitsa Toshirova and Anete Atvare came together to form Ratio 7:1 as part of a course module that required students to form a group and hold an exhibition of their work. The outcome of this was Dismantle, an exhibition held at Gayfield Creative Spaces in Edinburgh between 20th-26th March 2015.

Since the start of the process, we aimed to put on an event that would be well received and memorable to the people who heard of us and passed through the doors, this is how Question Time came about. We wanted to put on a panel discussion set up by students for people who, like ourselves, were interested in gaining insight into what the landscape of Scottish photography is like and what it takes to become a player in the industry.

For us, the event was a huge success and the liveliness of the discussion was very inspiring. Hearing well respected individuals share fiery exchanges clearly showed an existing passion for photography. I know for sure that we, as well as many of our friends in the audience found the experience very motivating. What was particularly beneficial was getting the opportunity to hear people we perceive as successful speak openly about the relationship between their personal and professional lives. This was a great opportunity to build realistic expectations on what life will be like post university.

 

Photographer artist Ron O'Donnell (in blue) talks at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Photographer artist Ron O’Donnell (in blue) talks at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

The audience at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

The audience at the panel event. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

The panel! Left to right: Artist Ron O'Donnell, Street Level's Malcolm Dickson, Dr. Roberta McGrath of Napier Univ., John Dougan of Ratio 7:1, and Photographers David Eustace and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

The panel! Left to right: Artist Ron O’Donnell, Street Level’s Malcolm Dickson, Dr. Roberta McGrath of Napier Univ., John Dougan of Ratio 7:1, and Photographers David Eustace and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

After such a positive experience with Tuesday night’s discussion, I personally would love to explore the idea of hosting more panel discussions, perhaps hosting a weekend of talks in the future. I know that TalkSee Photography, who are based in Glasgow recently held a panel discussion with Malcolm Dickson of StreetLevel, Ben Harman of Stills and Amanda Catto of Creative Scotland on at the CCA in Glasgow which was well attended and offered good discussion points also. I wouldn’t be opposed to collaborating with the organisers at TalkSee to see what we can do to make sure debates continue to happen in both Glasgow and Edinburgh.

In regards to Ratio 7:1, after two long semesters we are taking a break to concentrate on other areas of our studies. This however does not mean that we won’t come back together in the future, it is just hard to say for sure at the moment. All seven of us will continue to make work and will hopefully have more opportunities to exhibit said works in the near future. You can keep up to date with all of our activity via our facebook page and out Twitter page.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Document Scotland and all of the participants for being a part of the discussion and supporting our exhibition and programme of events.” – John Dougan, Ratio 7:1 photography collective.

 

March 13, 2015
by Admin
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Mark Beaumont’s Africa Solo

Last year I had the pleasure of trotting through the Commonwealth with Mark Beaumont, Scottish cyclist, adventurer, television presenter and endurance athlete. I had to run to keep up.

But none the less, over late 2013 and early 2014, I worked with Mark on 4 continents and through 42 nations and territories, as we both accompanied the Queen’s Baton Relay ahead of the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. Mark was presenting a programme for BBC and I was the photojournalist on assignment covering the baton relay, and taking care of the story-telling side of things with the Twitter feed and writing a daily blog.

Mark Beaumont, in Turks And Caicos, 2014. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont, in Turks And Caicos, 2014. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

Now I’m pleased to team up with Mark again to do a little more work. In just less than a month’s time Mark sets off once more on travels, to cycle from Cairo, Egypt, to Cape Town in South Africa…and not just cycle it, but to break the speed record for that route. With the world record currently standing at 59 days and 8 hours, Mark hopes to complete the arduous 10,000km route in 50 days! You can read more about the upcoming trip, called Africa Solo, on Mark Beaumont’s website and in due course once it begins you’ll be able to follow his route and journey updated by GPS every 30minutes. It’s bound to be a great adventure and trip and I’m sure it’ll make for great reading and viewing, and of course I hope you join me in wishing Mark all the best on the journey, and on raising sponsorship for Orkidstudio (a humanitarian architecture and construction charity that Mark is proud to be Patron for) that the trip supports! Send Mark a message of support on his Twitter.

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Mark Beaumont (in white shirt), training in the Glasgow Velodrome. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont (in white shirt), training in the Glasgow Velodrome. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

I recently caught up with Mark to discuss his trip and to shoot a few photographs for him of his intensive training in the Glasgow Velodrome. Here’s a few, including a multi-coloured portrait shot one evening in Turks and Caicos on our previous assignment together… I’ll be posting more about Mark and this trip in the weeks to come. Stay tuned.

Mark Beaumont (in white shirt), training in the Glasgow Velodrome. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont (in white shirt), training in the Glasgow Velodrome. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont (on right), training in the Glasgow Velodrome. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

Mark Beaumont (on right), training in the Glasgow Velodrome. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2015, all rights reserved.

 

March 12, 2015
by Admin
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Found In Translation

Japan

It’s always great to see your photographs in magazines and books, see how they’ve been used and see the layouts, the design…

This above spread comes from this month’s issue of Marie Claire UK, and is the opening spread of a 5 page travel article on Japan by Laura Miller. Four of my images, from my photography archive, grace the article. Both the photographs come from Kyoto, and show on the left – the Fushimi-Inarii Shrine with cherry blossom, and on the right is a portrait of a maiko (apprentice geisha), both photographs were shot in Kyoto. The article was picture edited by Kelly Preedy and Sarah Shillaker – thanks Ladies!

The title of the article, ‘Found in Translation’, made me smile a wry smile. Ever since Sofia Coppola brought out her hit movie ‘Lost In Translation‘ sub-editors throughout the land have borrowed and twisted the title to describe Japanese articles. This is at least the third article my pictures have been in which has the ‘Found In Translation‘ rift of the title. Sub editors gotta try harder to be original!

See more photojournalism and travel photographs from Japan on my archive site